Shh!… My SOUFFLE is rising*

So for any of you who have been reading my blog consistently you know that I have been trying to focus on how to help you make your eating life classier. Some how I ended up with very lavish and expensive taste in all aspects of my life, so I think that what I eat should be no different. 

We’ve covered almost all the bases over the past few weeks. What to eat for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, where to eat out, and what diets to go on. Now it’s time to discuss dessert. 

And the classiest dessert I can think of is souffle. 

A souffle is a classic French dessert. It is a mixture of milk, butter, eggs, flour, sugar, and also some other flavorings like chocolate, cheese, or pumpkin. Now when you hear that you may think that that pretty much sounds like a cake. And it is pretty much a cake, but when you combine those ingredients while using specific techniques then you create a completely different creation. 

The key to a great souffle is egg whites. The egg whites gives the souffle a mousse like consistency and also helps with it’s signature rise.

 

 

A souffle may seem hard to make, but trust me it’s not as complex as it may appear. It gets messy yes, but not hard. I made a souffle for the first time this past weekend for my sister and her husband. I was really nervous because I had never seen one being made so I didn’t know what it should look like at the different stages or if I was doing anything right. But I followed Martha’s recipe, and as always she led me to a delicious ending. 

 

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Martha’s Chocolate Souffle:

1/2 cup softened unsalted butter, 1/2 stick

1/2 cup plus 2 tbsp granulated sugar, plus more for dusting

1 1/2 cups whole milk

6 large eggs separated, plus 2 large egg whites, all at room temperature 

1/4 all purpose flour

8 ounces chocolate (Martha says bittersweet, I used milk chocolate, or you could use white chocolate and that would be really good)

1 tsp vanilla extract

Salt

Caramel Anglaise 

 

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. with the rack in lower third. Place six 10-ounce ramekins on a rimmed baking sheet. Brush inside ramekins with butter. Dust with sugar, and tap out excess. Using kitchen twine, secure a strip of parchment paper around each ramekin so that parchment extends 3 inches above rim. Chill in freezer 15 minutes (up to overnight).

    2.  Bring milk almost to a simmer in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Remove from heat; set                     aside.

    3.  Put 1/2 cup sugar and the egg yolks into the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat on high speed until pale, 3 to 4 minutes. Reduce speed to low; beat in flour. Add                 about one-third of the hot milk in a slow, steady stream, beating until just combined.

     4.  Pour yolk mixture back into pan with the remaining milk. Bring mixture to a simmer over medium heat, and cook, stirring constantly, until thick, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl. Stir in      chocolate, vanilla, and 1/8 teaspoon salt. The souffle base can be made a day ahead and refrigerated,           covered, until ready to bake the souffles.

     5. Put egg whites and a pinch of salt into a large copper bowl. Using a balloon whisk, beat until foamy. (Alternatively, beat egg whites and a pinch of cream of tartar instead of the salt in the bowl of the                  electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment.) Add 1 tablespoon sugar, and beat until soft peaks                form. Add remaining tablespoon sugar, and beat until stiff peaks form.

     6. Using a rubber spatula, fold one-third of the egg whites into chocolate mixture. Gradually fold in remaining egg whites.

     7. Carefully pour batter into prepared ramekins on baking sheet, filling to just below rims. Bake 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 375 degrees. Bake until set, about 15 minutes. Remove parchment. Poke a           hole in top of each, and pour in caramel creme anglaise. 

 

Remember to always serve these immediately. Although it is a bit of a wives tale that loud noises and the slightest movement will make a souffle fall, they are very delicate and will fall within 5 – 10 minutes of coming out of the oven. Bon Appetit!

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Brownie & Ice Cream Pie

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I’m usually the person who brings the dessert to the party. There are probably several reasons for this. For starters, cooking for groups of people is scary and desserts are hard to screw up (sugar = tasty). Secondly, everyone likes dessert so you know it will be a hit (sugar = opioid addiction). And I’m sure psychology factors into this as well – it’s satisfying to watch others dig in to a dessert you’ve created. Living vicariously through others’ plates so to speak.

This week at Digitally Delicious we are going to enter the world of baking. You can certainly get pretty fancy with your desserts. For instance, if you want to really impress, check out these fantastical cakes via notmartha.

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But if you don’t have that kind of time, a super easy but incredibly delicious dessert is Brownie Pie with ice cream and fresh fruit. In theory it’s no different than regular brownies and ice cream except for that it is all in one dish. Thus, it gives the impression that much more effort was involved. Also, I am a firm believer that adding fresh fruit to anything automatically makes it good for you – this is a dessert with vitamins folks.

I got the idea for Brownie Pie a few months back when I had to make something for a potluck lunch. I set about making brownies but found when I tried to cut them into squares they crumbled into very messy looking pieces. Feeling that I really couldn’t present these sad and oddly shaped food stuffs to others I was in a pinch. But then inspiration struck and Brownie Pie was born (admittedly, not as inspired as spider cakes but waaaaaay faster and cheap).

The majority of time spent on this recipe is waiting for the brownies to cook and then to cool. Making the brownies the day before will save time. If possible, it is best to keep the ingredients separate and assemble shortly before serving.

Ingredients:

– 1 Box of Brownie Mix (usually requires eggs and cooking oil – check your box)

– Ice cream (choose your fav)

– Fresh fruit (again, totally up to you but strawberries and bananas are a nice combo).  

Directions (in no particular order):

Bake the brownies according to package directions. Let cool.

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Scoop ice cream into a separate baking dish (as much as you like, just make sure to leave room for the brownies & fruit on top). Remember making ice cream soup as a kid? Work on that principle while you spread the ice cream along the bottom of the dish, approx. 1 – 2 ” thick. Cover and place in freezer until ready to serve.

 

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Cut up your brownies into small servings.

Be as messy as you like – It doesn’t matter!

Spread brownie pieces evenly over top of the ice cream base.

 

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Top off brownies and ice cream with sliced fruit.

Here I’ve used bananas and raspberries.

For added flare drizzle chocolate sauce on top.

 

 

Sorry, I couldn’t resist – looks like sugar isn’t the only bad thing in brownies …

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It’s not Bayside, it’s Seaside

Zack, A.C, Lisa, Screech, Jesse, and Kelly loved the Max. But this ain’t high school. If it were a vacation though, the ‘Saved’ gang would be more than happy hanging out at Klay Talay – the best Asian cuisine in the world – located at El Dorado Seaside Suitesin Mexico. Klay Talay is Thai for ‘by the seaside’ which is quite the clever name.

klay-talayI know it sounds a little strange: The best Asian food is located in Mexico. You’re just gonna have to trust me. Unless you’re going to the orient, this is THE best!!

Klay Talay’s menu is your traditional Asian food restaurant, with all the dishes you might expect. Stuff with rice for example, or dishes with noodles. Ha – I’m just kidding, but they do serve noodles and rice (who doesn’t).

Honestly though, they serve a blend of traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Thai dishes that do not have words to describe their excellence, they must be eaten to fully understand the yumminess. I’m not a fan of sushi but I have it on good authority that the sushi at Klay far surpasses anything we have locally. Don’t know what it is, I guess they know what there doing.

If you’re going on vacation give this place a shot. You won’t be disappointed, besides Klay, there is a wide variety of restuarants to be chosen from at El Dorado Seaside. Man, I’m starting to feel like one of their representatives……..

Have a great weekend and don’t forget to check back. Starting Monday, it’s super awesome baking week at DD and we have some wonderful things planned throughout the week (Tetris anyone?). It’s been lovely,

W – no Bush, just me.

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Fromagerie des Basques

This past summer I had the amazing experience of doing the Explore Program. A great opportunity, if any of you have the chance to do, take it. You will not be disappointed. I spent 5 weeks this past summer in Trois-Pistoles, Quebec. This is a small town of about 4,000 people. It had an amazing view and was right on the St. Laurent River and it had the best cheese ever!

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The Fromagerie has so many different types of cheeses it is insane. While down there, we made a local trip to the Fromeragie. If you do not like cheese, they had amazing ice cream as well. One really cool thing, is that they have a huge window that allows you to see into the factory and you can see how the cheese is made. Unfortunately for me, the day my class took the tour of the factory, I was sick, however I heard it was pretty cool.

Some of my favorite types of cheese I liked was the the cheddar fumé au bois d’erable (which is smoked fume1maple syrup cheddar cheese), ok this sounds weird, but tasted really good.

 

 

 

 

Another type all of us students enjoyed was Kwick-Kwick cheese. The first time I tried it, I didn’t like it, but assaisonneafter a second attempt, I loved it. It is very firm pieces of cheese, since it is the curd. There are many different flavors to choose from – BBQ, pepper, bacon, tomoto and basil and original. My favorite is the BBQ or the bacon flavor. This also made it an easy and quick snack as well.

 

 

Unfortantely, being back out in Alberta, it is almost impossible to obtain these cheeses. However, if I get the chance to go back, I am definitely making a stop at the Fromagerie. If anyone has the chance to go to Trois-Pistoles, don’t forget to check out the Fromeragerie.

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Sask-a-WHAT?*

So you’ve wandered into Saskatchewan.

Don’t panic. People from Saskatchewan aren’t the crazy gun toting hicks that we are pegged to be. It’s true that you can see for miles from any point in Sask and our roads are the worst in the country, but that doesn’t mean that we don’t have a lot going on. (Tip for traveling: Playing dodge the pot holes makes the trip go by really fast)

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All of this advice is coming from experience. I am a Saskatchewaner or a Saskachewanian if you wish. I spent most of my life there and while I don’t intend on living there forever, or even live there now, I still think it has a lot to offer. One thing in particular is really amazing food.

The best Asian food I have ever tried was in Saskatchewan. If you have a craving for some Thai food go to Keo’s Kitchen in Saskatoon or Nit’s Thai Food in Moose Jaw. For the incredible Filipino food go to Fiesta Manila in Prince Albert. And for the best Chinese food I have ever had, go to the Pierce Cafe in Pierceland.

Keo’s Kitchen: Keo’s Kitchen is small family owned Thai and Lao restaurant. It was named the number two restaurant in Saskatoon by tripadvisor.com. They are known for their Phad Thai and Hot and Sour Soup that people travel for hours to get. They have a big menu so everyone is guaranteed to find something they enjoy, including vegetarians and vegans.

Location – 1013 Broadway Ave. Saskatoon, SK

Fiesta Manila: Fiesta Manila is another family owned business specializing in Filipino food. It is one of the first places I go to when I go back home. My favorite dish is the candied pork, while my friend Debbi likes this pineapple chicken thing. It’s all so delicious so it won’t matter what you order. The staff are really friendly and helpful, and give good suggestions for your different tastes.

Location – 922 Central Ave. Prince Albert, SK

Nit’s Thai Food Ltd: Nit’s is a Thai Restaurant (obviously) in Moose Jaw. They use very traditional recipes that keep the food authentic and tasting so incredible. Tripadvisor.com rated it thirteenth overall for all restaurants in Moose Jaw.

Location – 124 Main Street North. Moose Jaw, SK

Pierce Cafe: The Pierce Cafe is owned by a Chinese couple who moved to Saskatchewan a long time ago. They cook both Chinese and American classics, but no one goes there for the burgers. People drive from all over just to get a number C (that’s how it is on the menu). You won’t find this restaurant on tripadvisor.com but I definitely recommend it, and so will anyone else who’s ever eaten there.

Location – Main Street. Pierceland, SK

So if you’re going on a cross-country trip or just have the displeasure of crossing that boarder to the dark side, at least now you know where to get a decent meal. Enjoy!

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Off to Borough Market

One of the highlights of travel is experiencing new foods and cultural cuisines, so this week Digitally Delicious will bring you tasty fares from around the globe. This summer I had the chance to visit Borough Market in London, England.

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The Market itself has been located on this exact spot for approximately 250 years, but has been in existence for much longer than that. First mention of the Borough Market was in 1276 and it’s believed that the market dates back to the time of the Romans (over 2000 years!). The proposed Thameslink project (a railway line) is currently threatening to demolish this historic site. Those of you who’d like the chance to visit, please consider signing the online petition to save this area.

A Traditional English Breakfast - served at pretty much every place I've stayed in England

A Traditional English Breakfast

Now England is not exactly renowned for it’s delicious dishes. At its best it’s chippies and beer, at it’s worst, images spring forth of bangers and mash or kidney pie. And there’s nothing like a full English breakfast to make you heave a little after a night of too much beer.

England’s bad food is a stereotype of course and Borough Market proves this without a doubt. It had everything you would expect to find at a food market – fresh fruits and veggies, breads, all sorts of cheeses. But it also had desserts, fresh baked veggie pies, meats, fish, wines, olive oils, prepared salads, flowers, and so much more. We bought enough food and wine to feed five and proceeded to have a lovely picnic on a friend’s barge.

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The market is open Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays and is not for the clausterphobic. Be prepared to join the throngs of people and slowly make your way from stall to stall. But fighting the crowds is worth the effort. You won’t find fare like this anywhere else. Plus, you can visit one of the many drink vendors and enjoy a tasty (alcoholic no less!) beverage while you shop. I can’t think of anything more civilized than that.

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With summer behind us here’s a recipe for Sangria to bring a little sunshine into your November. It is inspired by the one I enjoyed last July at Borough Market. The recipe calls for 2 shots of Malibu or Brandy but I’ve made it without and it tastes just as good. Also, if your serving this to guests, consider leaving the slices of oranges and lemon out until right before serving. If left overnight they tend to get stained by the wine and don’t look as pretty.

Red Wine Sangria with fresh fruit

Ingredients:
1 bottle of red wine – any kind you like
1 lemon
2 oranges (one for garnish)
1/2 cup berries or other chopped fruit (optional – blueberries and strawberries work nicely)
Few sprigs of fresh mint leaves (optional – for garnish)
2 tbs sugar
2 shots Malibu or Brandy
2 cups Club Soda or Ginger Ale

– Wash all fruit well.
– Cut lemon and ONE orange in half
– Squeeze juice from each into large jug.
– Thinly slice remaining halves

– Wash and quarter any additional fruit (berries) you want in your drink

In same jug add
• All cut fruit (possibly leaving out orange/lemon slices until next day)
• 2 tbs of sugar to jugp8100432
• 2 shots of Malibu
• Wine
Chill overnight.

Before serving add 2 cups of club soda to the wine and fruit mixture.

Add in orange/lemon slices if they were not already included.

Slice and halve remaining orange to use as garnish. p8100433

For an extra special touch you can use one of the orange slices like a ‘stamp pad’ to wet the rim of your wine glasses.

 Then dip the rim in sugar.

Add a sprig of mint and slice of orange to each glass before serving.

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Hi all, fresh-foods-fruits-vegetables

Almost the weekend again. Time for some fun. Before that though, lets talk about Vegetarianism.

Well it is a choice that suits my current lifestyle (wait didn’t I eat chicken yesterday?!). Um, for the most part it isn’t all that hard to eat fruits and vegetables, it’s just hard to buy them (I don’t wanna go back to Safeways).

I bet people would eat more fresh vegetables if there was a drive thru grocery store. That would be convenient. I can imagine sitting in line (with my grocery list), making some poor sap run the isles while I moan and groan that “these are the freshest strawberries you could find?”

That store would have disgruntled employees, I know this……

Wow, I just googled drive thru grocery store – Someone stole my idea!!! Smart cats….but, they only sell canned goods and staple items it seems – I guess they knew about the strawberries.

Nice thing about vegetarianism is that there is still many options available in the ‘fast food’ department. Subway and Pita Pit still work for ya, you just need to mind the meats (ie. don’t freakin’ order them). Actually, Extreme Pita proudly displays an “only veggie side” of their grills (as to please the veggies out there).

I applaud people who can abstain from one of the food groups, the problem is some of that animal product is just too tasty. Don’t pass it up – pass it over!!

Ya’ll be safe, eat well, be merry. Till next time,

W with 6 eh’s – Y, because I said so……..

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